Follow me on social media

Facebook is my main news hub where I share upcoming releases, gigs, photos, videos, and blogs. Typically, I post 3–5 times a week.

Telegram and Twitter duplicate what I post on Facebook, with occasional extra content.

On Vkontakte, I write in the Russian language for my fans out of from Russia and CIS.

I also upload vlogs and gigs videos on YouTube and share travel photos, selfies, and studio routine on Instagram.

108 posts tagged

Advice

I’m happy to advise on such topics as production, performance, management, marketing, and design in the music industry and beyond. Send me your questions at daniellesden.com/advice/ask

How I prepare for gigs

Vlog 004

This vlog episode is all about my travel to London where I’m playing at The Egg Loft at Dance:Love:Hub. Also in this video I share 3 tips how I prepare for gigs, so I hope you’ll learn something new as well.

What do you guys think about this video format, pace, and duration? I’m still not feeling quite comfortable in front of a camera, so any suggestions are welcome.

P.S. Soundtrack credits: Sideform​ and AudioFire​

Oct 18   Advice   DJing and performance   Gigs   United Kingdom   Vlog

Check the low end

How can I improve my mix and make the kick and bass sound clean?

Daniel

Quite often upcoming producers send me their tracks for a feedback and ask how to improve a mix. Today, I’d like to share a simple, yet one of the most effective tips for improving a mixdown that beginners seem to forget about — check the low end.

You see, when certain frequencies overlap each other, they might create some phasing issues or a muddy mix especially in the kick-bass area.

What is sound
Phase cancellation explained

The problem is many samples that you most likely use in the production has a lot of unnecessary frequencies in the lower end. For example, let’s take a listen to a typical TR-909-like hi-hat:

Sounds like a mid to high-frequency range hat, right? Well, take a look at its spectrum:

Picture 1. Hi-hat spectrum

There’s a lot of low-end frequencies too! And the same applies to snare drums, ride cymbals, noise sweeps, and many other sounds that appear to be a mid to high, but in fact, include a lot a lower end as well.

The solution is simple.

First, make sure to actually check the spectrum of a sample you use. Second, if there is anything unwanted — cut it with a high-pass filter. Like this:

Picture 2. Hi-hat EQed

You can absolutely feel free to cut below 200 Hz in most cases and sometimes even below 500 Hz. You probably won’t even notice this audibly, but it does make a huge difference for the kick and bass mixdown.

It’s safe to say that I use EQ on pretty much every channel (or a group of channels) in my projects and I would recommend doing this too.

Oct 4   Advice   Mixdown   Music production

Pros and cons of my career decisions

Vlog 003

I’ve got great comments to my previous vlog, in particularly, Elimelec Domínguez asked the following:

“If you had to start again in your career, what would you focus on? What skills and areas are vital to the success that you already have? What things would you completely rule out?”

Wow, I love it. I recorded a new vlog episode to answer these questions, I hope other upcoming producers will find it useful too. So there you go, pros and cons of my career decisions:

Thanks to Digital Om Productions for the nice t-shirt :-)

Sep 22   Advice   Behind the scenes   Career   Vlog

Why music alone is not enough

Vlog episode 002

It seems my vlog pilot episode was accepted quite nicely, so I’ve made a new episode for you.

“Is having just music enough to make a career as an artist? Why producers need an audience? Is it artist’s duty to do marketing?” — in this vlog, I’ll try to answer these questions and give four tips based on my experience, along with taking you on my trip to Greece.

Read also:
Managing social media with Amplifr
A website vs. Facebook for musicians

Sep 3   Advice   Gigs   Greece   Marketing   Social media   Vlog

Creating a weird psychedelic lead

How to emulate a typical psychedelic glitchy sound you hear in tracks from the artists like Imagine Mars, Tristan, Ajja, etc?

Zahaan

Zahaan, I don’t know for sure how these guys making their sounds, but I’ll share my thoughts on how to achieve something similar.

Formally speaking, this sound is very simple and it’s made of two key components: a bandpass filter and an LFO with a “Sample and Hold” waveform, all the rest is a processing. Special thanks to my colleague Evgeniy Dolgih for hinting that specific LFO type, I probably wouldn’t figure it out myself.

Let’s try to recreate it from scratch. I going to use Sylenth1, but you can use any other synthesiser you have as long as it has an LFO.

Recommended synths

Initial preset. Single oscillator with Saw wave and one voice. Filter bandpass filter type and assign modulation envelopes to the filter cut off.

You should get something like this:

Initial preset with a few tweaks in the filter and envelopes sections

Now in the LFO section, assign it to the filter cut off and choose “Sample and Hold” waveform in the dropdown menu. Tweak rate and gain knobs up to your taste.

Here is what we’ve got:

Choosing LFO waveform in the dropdown menu

That’s pretty much it. You can play around with the LFO rate, add distortion, reverb, frequency shifter, or any other audio processing effects.

After spending a couple of minutes tweaking it, I’ve come up with this really weird sound:

And here’s how it sounds like in context:

Effects processing chain

Have fun tweaking yours!

P.S. I had a personal chat with Zahaan sharing these tips, and he eventually made the following sound using an extra phaser and distortion:

Well done!

Aug 23   Advice   Music production   Sound design

My Ableton setup explained

Vlog pilot episode

Many people find my humble advice blog useful and I’m happy to hear that. However, the number one request that I get asked all the time is to make videos, not just articles in the written form. I find myself watching more and more YouTube channels lately, so I totally get that.

Well, you asked — you get it. In fact, I’m thinking to make this whole vlog thing on a regular basis, although I’m not entirely sure yet. Think about this video as a pilot episode.

I know some people prefer to watch a video on Facebook, so I’ll put that link here as well.

Three fun facts. I had to cut almost half of the content from this video, otherwise it would be 40 minutes long. This video took me about 20 hours to make, not including time spent on a couple of failed attempts. Since it was the first montage I made in Final Cut Pro X ever, I’ve watched 70 video lessons alongside with making it.

Aug 17   Ableton   Advice   Behind the scenes   DJing and performance   Vlog

Celebrating 100 articles in the advice series

What I’ve learned and what’s next

In August 2015 I launched the advice series to help aspiring producers and spread the knowledge. And last week I posted the 100th article in this series. Hundred articles on music production, sound design, DJing, industry insights, marketing, and career advice. This is huge.

I thought such round number would be a nice moment to thank everyone who sent me the questions and contributed to the blog. So thank you guys, thanks for your curiosity and strive for knowledge which drive this series forward. You’re awesome! <3

And taking this opportunity I would also like to tell a bit of what I’ve learned for the past two years of writing this series and what comes next.

What I’ve learned

  1. Good always wins
    When I introduced the advice series, all sceptics were saying that people will steal the tricks and ideas I share, that I will look stupid by trying to teach other people whilst I’m still an uprising producer myself (“You know nothing, Jo... Lesden”) and more criticism. Well, I had no doubts that none of this will happen and I was right. I was amazed how many people found this blog useful and genuinely shared their own techniques as well. I have a feeling that over time we’ll see more producers sharing their knowledge, too.
  2. Knowing ≠ understanding
    I realised that knowing things is not the same understanding those things. When you explain things to other people, your mind process it differently and you certainly learn something new even if you thought you knew it before. I can’t stress enough how much I’ve learned from this.
  3. Content marketing works
    This whole advice idea came out purely out of altruistic initiative, I didn’t think about it as a marketing tool. But turned out, many people — including industry professionals — have discovered my music because of this advice blog. A kind of a side effect but in a good way. I certainly recommend other producers to start blogging, it helps people and increases the overall awareness about your name with no money investment needed, something that a classic advertisement can never do.
  4. Writing consistently is tough, but boosts your skills
    Back in 2015, I asked myself: can I possibly write a new article every week on a regular basis? Frankly, it was quite a challenge. I’m not a full-time writer nor a blogger, I’m a musician and DJ that writes about music and that’s a totally different thing. Writing a single article is tough, but writing a new piece of advice every week is quite a challenge indeed! Nevertheless, I have to admit that consistent writing helped me learn how to explain myself clearly and even become a tiny bit better in English.

What’s next

The advice series will continue to come out on Wednesday, but probably not every Wednesday. More like of When-I-can-s-day.

I want to keep delivering a thoughtful and well-made content that other producers hopefully find useful while experimenting with its frequency a bit — sometimes weekly, sometimes bi-monthly, sometimes less often.

I also have a few really cool projects on the way (won’t spoil it here), but sacrificing the quality of one project over another is the last thing I want to do. Quality > quantity, not the other way around.

As a consequence of this changing schedule, more questions will be stacked up in the queue. If you ever wanted to send me a question, I would suggest doing it today as from now on it will take a longer time to post a reply.

Jul 26   Advice   Behind the scenes

What’s in your DJ bag

Hi Daniel, I’m curious what do you put in your DJ bag for gigs? How to be sure you don’t forget anything? The reason I ask this is that I’ve got lucky to get my first international gig, don’t have much experience yet. Any tips on this?

Jared

Hey Jared, congrats on your first gig :-)

The things DJs put in their bags vary depending on their setup, event type, travel destination, and habits. I’ll show what I typically put in my bag, but before I’d like to give some tips that might help.

Essentials first

First things first, put whatever is essential for your performance. Whether you are a laptop DJ or playing on CDs, USBs or vinyl, put this first.

For USB sticks, be sure it’s not formatted as NTFS because Pioneer players won’t read flash drives with that file system.

For a laptop, be sure it runs your DJ software nice and smooth. Clean it from unnecessary apps that might be running in the background and slow down the performance. Don’t forget the charger with an appropriate plug and the cables.

Always have a plan B

Shit happens. I think none will argue with this. A software can crash, CDs can get scratched, USB stick can get lost. With that in mind, I highly suggest having a plan B and get some alternative source of music.

Let’s say, you perform on CDJ2000s with a USB stick, but entering the DJ booth you see CDJ1000 which doesn’t have a USB port. As being said, shit happens. You can start yelling to the organiser that he didn’t fulfil your tech rider but it probably won’t help. What would help, however, is a CD wallet that you’ve prepared in advance.

Hopefully none of these will happen, but for those rare case when it actually does happen, this might save your performance. I don’t DJ with the CDs anymore but still keep several discs in my bag.

Spare pairs

Continuing the previous point, I also suggest having extra pairs of some basic things. Get a spare USB cable, get an extra charging adapter, get another USB stick. Just in case.

Again, you’ll probably (and hopefully) won’t need any of those things, but it’s better safe than sorry. And it doesn’t occupy much space either.

Travel

Once you packed everything needed for your performance, time to get ready for the travel. Take your international passport and be sure it has at least six months before expiring date and at least one page for the stamp. Don’t forget your visa if you need it.

If you’re planning to have a carry-on bag only, be sure its weight and measurements fit the airline’s terms. Otherwise, you’ll be asked to put your bag in the baggage, which might end up not quite well for the equipment.

If you’re an iOS user, I would also advise adding your boarding passes to the built-in Wallet app. It works offline and shows your passes in a very convenient way. Just make sure to have a nice and easy access to your flight info, especially when you have multiple flights.

As for the question what’s in my bag, I though it would be boring to simply list all the things, so here is a picture I took for you:

Stuff that I typically put in my DJ bag. Cloth not included since it’s depend on the destination point weather and travel time

Fellow DJs, what you guys put in your bags? More cables? A travel pillow? I’m not a very frequent flyer either, so would love to hear some tips from more experienced colleagues too.

2017   Advice   DJing and performance

Музыкантам: советы при общении с зарубежными лейблами (18+)

To my English-speaking readers: the post below is written in the Russian language to help Russian music producers deal with foreign record labels. No worries if you don’t understand a thing :-)

Музыканты! Если вы отправляете свои треки на зарубежные лейблы, но при этом плохо владеете английским языком, этот пост для вас.

Я работаю A&R-менеджером на британском лейбле JOOF Recordings и получаю около ста новых демо-записей в неделю. Мне приятно, что среди них оказывается много русских музыкантов, но то, как написаны сопроводительные письма — это полный, кромешный пиздец.

Речь не об орфографии или грамматике, а о смысле: зачастую при дословном переводе с русского на английский (без нормального знания последнего) получается такая каша, что носитель языка либо ничего не поймет, либо подумает, что вы дебил. Перспективы так себе.

Приведу пять примеров из писем и расскажу, как надо.

1. Новая работа

Самая распространенная ошибка на моей практике — использование неуместного перевода слова “работа”. Пример из жизни:

“I would like to introduce you my new job.”

Хотя слово “работа” можно перевести как work, так и job, смысл у них совершенно разный в зависимости от контекста. Разумеется, гугл-транслейт контекст понимает плохо, поэтому и переводит чаще всего неправильно.

Говоря по-простому, job — это само понятие работы, деятельность, за которую обычно получают деньги. Это слово подойдет для фраз, например “я устроился на новую работу” (“I got a new job”) или “неполный рабочий день” (“part-time job”).

Словом же work обозначается скорее труд или достигнутый результат . Например, “я работаю с Васей” (“I work with Vasya”) или “работы Шекспира” (“the works of Shakespeare”).

Совет: если вы хотите назвать песню или трек работой, то используйте именно слово work, как показано в примере выше. Или так и пишите — “Here’s my new track”, без всяких ворков вообще.

2. Энджой

Еще одна частая проблема — письма в таком духе:

“Please check out my new track, I hope you like it. Enjoy!”

Вроде, с точки зрения языка всё нормально. Но проблема в том, что из письма не ясно, чего от тебя хотят, причём такие письма приходят в основном от русских музыкантов. Ну, заценил я трек, дальше-то что?

Капитан Очевидность может сказать, что отправитель конечно же ждет релиза, но вот нифига: иногда оказывается, что музыкант хочет чтобы этот трек сыграли на радио, иногда просто хочет услышать оценку, иногда — хз. Сам не знает.

Особенно обидно, когда трек оказывается хорошим. Ты такой “класс, давай издадим?”, а тебе в ответ “не-не, ребят, трек уже подписан на другом лейбле, я просто так вам отправил заценить”. Энджой, блеать!

Совет: не поленитесь добавить, с какой целью вы отправляете трек и чего вообще от лейбла хотите. Пишите ясно, как есть: “Хочу у вас издать трек, вот демо” или “У меня тут есть классный трек, возможно подойдет для вашего радио-шоу, вот промо”.

3. ФИО

Бывает, подписывают русского музыканта на лейбле, просят прислать данные для контракта, а он им такой:

“Real name: Vasiliev Gennadiy Andreyvich”

Ну ладно я, я-то пойму. А другие зарубежные лейблы, где нет русскоязычного менеджера? Ребят, пожалейте бедных иностранцев: они искренне недоумевают, почему фамилия стоит первая, что “среднее имя” (привычное для них middle name) на самом деле имя, а последнее — вообще имя отца, и самое главное как всё это друг от друга отличить.

Совет: если вас просят написать полное имя для контракта или другой формальной процедуры, пишите просто имя и фамилию. Без отчества и именно в таком порядке — имя и затем фамилия: Gennadiy Vasiliev, Daniel Sokolovskiy. Вроде мелочь, но сильно облегчает жизнь.

4. Творческий псевдоним

По-русски часто говорят: “я музыкант такой-то, мой творческий псевдоним такой-то”. И так по-английски и пишут:

“Hello! My name is Pavel and my creative pseudonym is Paul Sandy.”

Это как раз тот случай, когда вас поймут, но вероятно подумают, что вы дебил. Тут дело такое: по-русски фразу “творческий псевдоним” можно заменить на “псевдоним, под которым я занимаюсь творческой деятельностью” и будет всё в порядке. По-английски же слово “creative” еще означает “оригинальный” и “уникальный”, поэтому получается, будто вы сразу даете оценку своему псевдониму.

Это все равно что сказать “у меня потрясающая музыка и очень оригинальный псевдоним” — согласитесь, как-то не очень, отдаёт хвастовством. Вдобавок, если вас зовут Павлом и вы издаёте музыку под именем Пол, то такой псевдоним нифига не криэйтив.

Совет: stage name и alias — этими словами чаще всего называют псевдонимы артистов. Просто запомните. Никакие “pseudonym” не нужны.

5. Письмо

Находчивые русские музыканты знают, что если лейбл не отвечает на письмо уже неделю, то можно смело отправить второе — напоминание. И в общем-то правильно, вот только такие письма зачастую выглядят примерно так:

“I sent you a letter last week, please check it.”

В 2017 стало нормой называть электронные письма просто письмами, без всяких корявых “e-мэйлов”. Но гугл-транслейт об этом не знает, поэтому фразу “я отправил вам письмо” скорее всего переведёт как “I sent you a letter”. Разница в том, что letter — это бумажное письмо. Конверт такой, который отправляют “Почтой России”.

Как-то из-за такого письма пришлось пройтись по всем сайтам и аккаунтам лейбла, чтобы проверить, не указан ли где-то физический почтовый ящик в качестве контактов для демо. Короче, не делайте так.

Совет: запомните, письмо — это mail или email. Не пугайте людей спамом почтового ящика в подъезде.

У меня таких примерно еще штук сто, но пока остановлюсь на этих пяти :-) Если есть что добавить — пишите, комментарии ниже открыты.

Читайте также по теме (на английском):

2017   Advice   Music industry

Learning music production for authentic results

Some thoughts on how to learn using a reference track but not ending up like a someone’s clone

Stormtroopers from Star Wars Episode VII. Sometimes, browsing Beatport new releases causes the same feeling

Hey Daniel, a lot of forums, tutorials and courses out there recommend learning by using reference tracks, deconstructing arrangements and rebuilding sounds/presets.

This sounds fine in principle, but in practice, I can’t help wondering if this has also created a lot of similar sounding music on Beatport, across all genres.

It may take longer and be more challenging to not use any form of reference but do you think that ultimately, it will lead the producer (over months and years) to more authentic results?

If not, how do you recommend reference tracks/sounds/arrangements are used to enhance learning but not limit creativity?

Doron

That’s a great question, Doron. I’m in a camp with those who suggest learning and training your ears using a reference track indeed, and I do agree that stores are flooded with similar music with a lack of originality. But I don’t think that using a reference whilst learning is what caused this. 

Train your ears using a reference track

You see, there is a different between analysing and trying to recreate certain sounds for educational purpose and deliberate copying someone’s else music. When you just starting out, you seek for answers for the questions that puzzling you: how is this bassline made? Is that a saw or a square wave? Does my lead sits well in the mix? And learning other producer’s music is a great way to answer them. Those who want to blindly copy other’s music will find a way, anyway.

When I started this blog, people often asked me something like “are you not afraid sharing your trade secrets so the others will steal your tricks?”, and I always said “no, I don’t”.

For example, I shared the way I made the robotic texture and atmospheric effects used in my tracks. There is nothing really fancy about it, it’s all basic stuff for anyone with a decent experience, but for beginners it might be a breakthrough. “Hm, so he made the texture using a simple noise oscillator and a filter... what if I’ll change it to a saw wave instead? And do this instead of that?” — that type of thinking I would advise to have when you read a tutorial or when you use a reference track. Think of a general concept, a method that can be implemented in so many ways rather than using any given tutorial or reference as it is. This is how the learning curve goes.

I would also like to talk about two more things: the format and the content.

Let’s take newspaper as an example. Typically, there are some current events printed on a low-grade paper, probably with some logo on the top and a big bold heading. You know it’s a newspaper just by looking at it. But I don’t think anyone accuses “The Guardian” of ripping off “The Time” or vice versa, or any other newspaper cloning each other. That’s because a newspaper is just a format of the production.

Now speaking about music, all those kicks, basses, mixdowns etc. are just a format of some particular genre. Let’s say, you know it’s a Psytrance when you hear a certain tempo and beat patterns. But you shouldn’t solely focus on that alone, and I think this is where many producers fall off.

Beginners forget that the content is what people listen to music for, same reason why they read the newspapers. And when I say content in terms of music, I’m don’t mean a fancy kick drum but rather a feeling, emotions that this track awakes in you; something that will make you want it to listen again and again. How to create an interesting music content is another huge topic, and it’s a talk for another time.

Fellow producers out there, I’m keen to know what do you guys think about it? The comments box below is open for you.

2017   Advice   Personal development
Earlier Ctrl + ↓