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Why I no longer upload my live sets

Playing at Shankra Festival, Switzerland, 2017

I used to upload my recorded live sets and some people ask a pretty fair question: why I no longer do this? Well, there are two reasons behind this decision: unreleased music and experiencing the moment.

Unreleased music

Being a music producer and a DJ, I always have quite many unreleased tracks in stock both from myself and the fellow producers that send me their promos. And despite the fact it’s much safer to play favourites and well-tested tracks, I love to play unreleases as it gives a unique musical experience for the people on the dance floor.

But these perks come with a cost and responsibility.

Since I get these tracks before the actual release date, I feel the importance of keeping them safe. This is especially true for the albums which take much longer to produce and release. For example, the tracks that have been released as a part of my second album “2000 Years Ahead” in January 2017 was actually made in early 2016, almost a year before the official date. If I’d upload a set full of such tracks a year before the release, it would be no point to actually releasing it.

Experiencing the moment

Every time I play on a gig, I’m trying to create a special musical journey for that particular event, a special moment that works right here, right now. For example, last time in London I kicked things off with a Techno groove and finished the set with a 145 BPM Psychedelic, both are quite beyond what you’d normally call a ‘Daniel Lesden style’ but it worked magically on that event.

The problem is when you listen to such sets at home, instead of getting goosebumps you basically just sit confused and ask why the hell it’s a Techno track now playing? Or why there were no breakdowns for the last ten minutes? Or why he’s made a mashup of this track? From the home listening perspective, it’s just a yet another set, not much different from a monthly radio show episode.

So, this is why I don’t upload my sets anymore. I keep recording them, though, so I could listen back and analyse it: see where the mixing wasn’t perfect, where the effects probably weren’t necessary, etcetera. And it’s a great way to improve your skills, by the way, I’d suggest to give it a try even if you consider yourself an experienced DJ.

Let me know what do you think about it?

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Nov 7   I am   Live sets
1 comment
Drev

thanks for posting, Daniel, I agree with what you saying.

I notice it has become a trend in recent years for whole sets to be uploaded. Boom, Ozora and other festivals are releasing countless hours of music from artists. While I do enjoy listening to these, I also feel it devalues the experience of attending these festivals and hearing this live. Also, why would a fan buy an album from an artists if there’s several 90-minute sets from that artist available for streaming or download, that probably include most of the album tracks?

On the other hand, some of these live sets are my most played files in my mp3 player due to the flow they have compared to an album which starts and stops. So while I enjoy having this as a downloaded file, I also think the prevalence of releasing full live sets to the public can be problematic for artists oversaturating the market and devaluing the unique experience of their live set.

Daniel Lesden

That’s a great addition to my thoughts, thank you Drev.

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